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17

The data pin-outs are the same, assuming a reasonably “new” 5.25” drive, not an early ‘80s model. It was a common upgrade to replace the second 5.25” drive on an older machine with a 3.5” one, so you could have a choice of format depending on your needs. They were interchangeable. You might have an issue with the power though. I don’t remember seeing a 5....


11

Firstly, a little bit of background information. The Gotek is designed to work with a wide number of computers, not just IBM-compatibles. The original standard for floppy drives (designed by Shugart) allowed for up to four floppy drives to be connected to one controller. The controller would indicate which drive it wanted to communicate with by activating a ...


8

The role of Termcap in contemporary Unix-style systems is the same as it always has been: it provides a library and database allowing software to adapt to the varying capabilities of different terminals. These terminals can be physical (connected to a serial port, typically) or virtual, provided by any one of a number of terminal emulators (the console on ...


8

The laptop you describe is unlikely to be able to support USB ports, for hardware reasons. But there may be an alternative solution. The first USB standard (version 1.0) was published in 1996, but didn't really gain traction in the PC market until version 1.1 was released in 1998. The PCI bus standard had been published in 1992, and by the mid 1990s it was ...


7

The connections on the 34-pin ribbon cables are identical, but the size of the connectors are different. You can get ready made cables with both 5.25 and 3.5 connectors, for example http://www.cablesonline.com/36unflopdriv.html (and of course from Ebay also). These are likely to be more reliable than trying to wire a 5.25 connector onto a 3.5-sized cable by ...


6

The FreeDOS kernel doesn’t support USB drives on its own. When you boot from a USB drive, the CSM makes it available through the BIOS 13h services, so it appears to DOS as a “standard” drive and everything works fine. When you boot from your SATA drive, the CSM doesn’t set anything up for your USB drive (although in some cases it can be induced to do so) ...


4

I'd suggest moving the jumper from S0 to S1 - IBM compatibles expect drives to respond as Unit 1, not Unit 0.


4

Erm. I think here are a few misunderstandings at work. Termcap is a descriptional database about terminal features (*1), not device configurations. In sense of Unix terminals aren't devices, but something connected to a device. In a more general sense, Unix-devices are (*2) interfaces that can be accessed using OS measures. It may be this basic mixup ...


3

Thanks for all the support! I resolved in the following way, hoping this could help someone else with the same doubts in the future. Connectors Jumpers on Gotek Resuming: 2 HxC Gotek drives (SFRM72-TU100K) on a 16bit-based XT-clone (cpu NEC V30 at 8MHz with 640MB RAM), 720Kb each, detected as A: and B:, read/write enabled, working well on MS-DOS (all ...


3

A completely different approach is to find an Ethernet card instead and use any available network resource (like a NAS or a Windows share on another host or the internet). I used 3com and xircom cards back then. You can use Win95 or a small 486 Linux distribution without too much elbow grease, and it will probably be the fastest in terms of moving data ...


3

This will work with the USB floppy drive you have mentioned, a Chuanganzhuo one, using Windows 10. You have to use a proper Double Density floppy disk, not a High Density one. I tried it with a High Density floppy disk and it gave me Parameters not supported by drive. C:\Users\J>format a: /T:80 /N:9 Insert new disk for drive A: and press ENTER when ...


2

I successfully formated 720K on win10 by respecting the two conditions: only some chipsets (in the USB drive) support 720K, usually older chipsets the drive must detect the floppy as a 720K Point 2 is sometime an issue if you use 1.44 floppy disks. I only have those so I usually put a paper to hide the hole in the floppy cases indicating the 1.44 MB format....


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