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8

No, or at least not without consideration. According to the sticker atop the PSU it delivers: 3.75 Ampere at +5 Volt, 0.1 Ampere at -5 Volt and 1.25 Ampere at +12 Volt A quick check of the BBC Model B (*2) reveals that +12 Volt are not used, while -5 Volt is only used with the cassette interface for reading So if you do not intend to read cassette tapes, ...


3

If you want some DIY, you can try my opensource project, usb2ps2conv. It lets you make a USB-keyboard to PS/2-computer converter out of an STM32F401C-DISCO board and a couple of resistors. This project is currently in development, but it's already functional enough to control a Linux PC via a USB keyboard plugged into a PS/2 port through this converter. The ...


3

The price tag is certainly higher (~100€), but AFAICT you can use a KryoFlux to read everything (even strange low-level software protections): Works with all major 3.5" and 5.25" drives Works well with selected 3" (e.g. Amstrad FDI-1) drives. Also works with 8" (e.g. Shugart 851; might require additional adapter) drives; other types of ...


2

You could maybe solve the 2-step conversion in 2 separate steps: Belkin used to offer a Sun keyboard/mouse to PS/2 adapter as part of their KVM product line (these adapters seem to be available fairly cheaply from eBay ). Once you have a standard PS/2 connectpr, converting that to USB should be possible with standard adapters for PCs.


2

There are some keyboards that can electrically and logically handle both USB-HID and PS/2 protocols, and just need a passive adapter to make the plug fit physically. The latter is probably what you were able to dig up. A keyboard that doesn't come with such an adapter probably only supports USB, so the adapter won't work in the first place. If you want a ...


1

Instead of the board you suggested or a KryoFlux, maybe build a FluxEngine. You just buy the specified FPGA development board, solder one row of pins from a floppy connector onto it (or, in a pinch, a row of pin header), flash it, and you're done. You'll also need one of those wall-to-Molex power bricks that you see bundled with USB-PATA/SATA adapters, but ...


1

The firmware on all the 3.5" USB floppy drives of relatively modern make I've looked into seems to present the floppy as a LBA device with exactly 2880 sectors (of 512 bytes) to the host computer. That is the very same thing as an USB thumb drive (and in fact, most OSs seem to see such a thumb drive. You can even partition such a floppy). Replacing the ...


1

This is certainly possible with third-party software. One option that I have seen used on real hardware is the Maximus-Decim Native USB Drivers, i.e. NUSB: 98 SE NUSB: Unofficial Windows 98 SE Native USB Drivers (NUSB) 3.3 adds native USB + USB 2.0 support for most internal + external USB devices (free): NUSB 3.3 [756 KB, English]. NUSB 3.3 [760 KB, ...


1

To boil down what others are saying: A USB device itself is incapable of making itself appear as a traditional floppy drive, because USB devices don't have that kind of access. However, if you're lucky, your BIOS will have support for USB floppy drives and it can apply the same virtualization trick that it uses to present USB keyboards and mice as PS/2 ...


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