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10

The role of Termcap in contemporary Unix-style systems is the same as it always has been: it provides a library and database allowing software to adapt to the varying capabilities of different terminals. These terminals can be physical (connected to a serial port, typically) or virtual, provided by any one of a number of terminal emulators (the console on ...


5

Erm. I think here are a few misunderstandings at work. Termcap is a descriptional database about terminal features (*1), not device configurations. In sense of Unix terminals aren't devices, but something connected to a device. In a more general sense, Unix-devices are (*2) interfaces that can be accessed using OS measures. It may be this basic mixup ...


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I found this: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Active_USB_to_PS2_Adatper_(keyboard%2Bmouse).jpg don't know where to get one though.


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If you want some DIY, you can try my opensource project, usb2ps2conv. It lets you make a USB-keyboard to PS/2-computer converter out of an STM32F401C-DISCO board and a couple of resistors. This project is currently in development, but it's already functional enough to control a Linux PC via a USB keyboard plugged into a PS/2 port through this converter. The ...


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The price tag is certainly higher (~100€), but AFAICT you can use a KryoFlux to read everything (even strange low-level software protections): Works with all major 3.5" and 5.25" drives Works well with selected 3" (e.g. Amstrad FDI-1) drives. Also works with 8" (e.g. Shugart 851; might require additional adapter) drives; other types of ...


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There are some keyboards that can electrically and logically handle both USB-HID and PS/2 protocols, and just need a passive adapter to make the plug fit physically. The latter is probably what you were able to dig up. A keyboard that doesn't come with such an adapter probably only supports USB, so the adapter won't work in the first place. If you want a ...


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Instead of the board you suggested or a KryoFlux, maybe build a FluxEngine. You just buy the specified FPGA development board, solder one row of pins from a floppy connector onto it (or, in a pinch, a row of pin header), flash it, and you're done. You'll also need one of those wall-to-Molex power bricks that you see bundled with USB-PATA/SATA adapters, but ...


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The firmware on all the 3.5" USB floppy drives of relatively modern make I've looked into seems to present the floppy as a LBA device with exactly 2880 sectors (of 512 bytes) to the host computer. That is the very same thing as an USB thumb drive (and in fact, most OSs seem to see such a thumb drive. You can even partition such a floppy). Replacing the ...


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