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33

Normally, the concern for electronics would be surviving not the nuclear winter (let's face it - there will be plenty more pressing survival matters to attend to than computers used for ballistic missile trajectory calculations), but the initial EMP from a nuclear blast. While not necessarily true - the solid-state PRC-77 radio set fared better in extensive ...


16

DEMOS was an extension of 2.9 BSD, and all the commands, utilities, etc. were kept in place with their original names and everything. The major areas of said extension were: Add a rudimentary Russian "locale" support for KOI8-R (a modified KOI-8). Almost all of BSD was extremely ASCII-centric, so it took a very significant amount of time and ...


13

The commands are more or less the same ones we're used to from BSDs. Examples cat and ls are clearly visible on this image from the Russian wikipedia page. But some things, such as the shell, appear to have translated error messages. For example, you can see Команда не найдена, or "Command not found". And this looks like it's running the C shell, ...


10

The paper, Strela 1, the First Soviet Computer: Political Success and Technological Failure, by Hiroshi Ichikawa, Hiroshima University, July-September 2006, would suggest otherwise. There is no mention of the design requirements specifying an ability to be able to survive a nuclear winter, only specifications on what hardware was to be included: an external ...


10

2.9BSD, being a self-hosting operating system, includes all the source code and all the tools necessary to build it. That includes the C compiler, the assembler, and everything. There is no mention anywhere of any of this being renamed for DEMOS, so it's a safe bet that they had the same name. DEMOS is similar in spirit to something like Russian Fedora Remix,...


8

Sounds like a great product, right? It does. 64 KiB code + 64 KiB data is about the ideal structure for an 8 bit CPU with 16 bit addressing. The thing is I cannot find any evidence that this chip was ever used anywhere by anyone. It came not only late, but as well at a rather troubled time, followed by an extreme fast swing to simply by world standard ...


2

There is a powerful bureaucratic and personal competition around the development of EVM "Strela", as well as competing BESM. Moreover, these computers were developed in conditions of different subordination and design standards. The EVM "Strela" in the Technical Task (formally approved document) turned out to be (probably inherited from ...


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