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14

This might just be stating the obvious, but Type 30 manual linked in the question describes the device as a random-position point-plotting cathode ray tube. Nowhere does the manual suggest it's a vector graphics display. It then further describes how the computer supplies the X,Y coordinates of a single point to be plotted. There is no facility to plot a ...


8

The need for IntelliFont (FAIS) format fonts kind of fizzled out, and Agfa concentrated on its industrial printing side from the late 1990s. Initially, Adobe wouldn't give a licence or open up their vector font formats to anyone. This prompted several competing vendors to produce vector font libraries in their own formats. Agfa-Compugraphic's IntelliFont was ...


8

The description of the Spacewar game gives some clues that the Type 30 was not able to display lines, but instead dots. Towards the end of the description, there is the listing how the spaceships were rendered, and even linear sections were given as repeated individual dots. With a true line-rendering capability, the engineers had surely used that instead of ...


6

The PDP-1 Type 30 display, which is the 'canonical' display for the PDP-1, was a point-plotting display, not a vector display. It was a specific device, not a general-purpose oscilloscope. Link to manual. The price list gives it at $14,300 in 1964, though that's the Type 30, not the 30E. HOWEVER, this 1964 PDP-1 price list lists OSCILLOSCOPE DISPLAY TYPE 34 ...


6

The PDP-1 actually used a CRT that was designed for radar (see e.g. the Wikipedia entry). But the whole electronics around the CRT needed to drive the CRT and interface it with the PDP-1 was custom built. And as such, it was nothing like the electronics needed in an oscilloscope. The same is true for later displays used in the PDP series. So the assumption ...


6

Well, I give you the SYM-1, as it could display text output on a user-supplied oscilloscope. Ray was just too much of an engineer to let that pass :) (*1) Beside that somewhat off beat example, I'd say next to every analogue computer would work great with a user supplied oscar. In a more general notion, at a time when displays became a thing, a user supplied ...


5

NOTE: This actually refers to the type 340, not the type 30, so it may be irrelevant! The Type 30 input commands worked in several different "modes", including point mode, vector mode, and character mode (with an optional character generator). The actual display was always point-based, unlike the Tektronix 4011/4014 displays which drew straight ...


1

Character generation can actually be done by partially analog style circuitry- and this has been done, for example to generate the on screen numeric readouts on Tektronix 5000/5400/7000 series oscilloscopes. Basically, some analog constants are "switched in" for whatever glyph is desired, and gradually applied one after another to the coordinate ...


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