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7

In the case of the PowerVR PCX1 and PXC2 devices (as in e.g. the Matrox 'm3D' and Videologic 'Apocalyse3D/3Dx') there was never any intention to directly support the 2D operations (e.g. blitting/rectangle filling/ bit map caching) required for the Windows system. Since these devices could write directly to the 2D card's framebuffer memory, via the burst ...


56

Early high-performance 3D accelerators such as the Voodoo Graphics have limited framebuffer resolutions (640×480 for most Voodoo Graphics configurations, 800×600 for the Voodoo2 in non-SLI) and colour depths (16-bit with dithering), which make them unsuitable for 2D — in the second half of the nineties, 1024×768 was a requirement at least in computer ...


1

I'm not sure if this is the right place to to mention this, but I confirm the outputs mentioned in the question (and reverse-engineer ones I'm not sure of) with this breakout DIN connector that I made: This allows me to bring the signals on to a breadboard where I can 'scope them out, cross-connect them to a more standard video cable into a monitor, and so ...


2

The BBC Master was designed with a fairly complex memory-map overlay system. There was 32KB of primary RAM, 128KB of ROM, four 16KB "sideways RAM" banks which could be loaded with ROM-like data from disk, and a 32KB "shadow RAM" bank which was used to move the video display and the disk filesystem workspace out of the primary RAM. This left much more of ...


1

The Soviet home computers Elektronika BK-0011(M) had 2 video pages. For some reason, the English page does not mention that fact, only the Russian one does: две страницы памяти можно было поочерёдно отображать на экран, что обеспечивало мгновенное обновление информации which means (Google translate) two pages of memory could be displayed alternately ...


3

The Sega Super Scaler series arcade machine boards did this, to a certain extent. They used multiple processors to update sprites while they were off screen. For example the Y Board had three 68000s sharing multiple RAM banks, two of which held separate sprite banks. The later System 32 had 768 K of dual-ported VRAM set up for sharing between the V60 main ...


2

Yes, such computers existed. First of all, we must remember about Agat, the Soviet almost-clone of Apple II. The native Agat-8 video mode (not compatible with Apple II) allowed using a memory page (one of many, with the ability to quickly randomly switch) for the video buffer that was disconnected from the address space of the processor. Later versions (from ...


2

Having found my way back here by accident, I'd like to put a shorter adjunct to my original longer answer: Growing up in PAL land, with generally smaller TVs and monitors, I don't recall there being much in the way of scanlines around, other than maybe when we switched to 60Hz mode on our ST and/or stretched the monitor V-size as far as possible to get rid ...


-1

Depends how forgiving your TV is about the line rate. If we consider that the actual sweep rate of both the horizontal and vertical sections are fixed, then by upping the line sync frequency we can physically fit more scanlines in the same space. A good estimate for the normally visible number of lines is around 216. Thus we need to increase the line rate ...


1

An interesting proposal... I do wonder if we may have seen the like if other advances hadn't made it irrelevant. For instance, in the case of the Amiga (and somewhat, the Atari STe) as well as a lot of consoles, the main things that this design would accelerate are instead cared for quite well by hardware scrolling, sprite engines (and/or general blitters), ...


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