474

This is because of a flaw in the way Windows 95 generates events, and the fact that many applications are event driven. Windows 95 applications often use asynchronous I/O, that is they ask for some file operation like a copy to be performed and then tell the OS that they can be put to sleep until that operation finishes. By sleeping they allow other ...


104

Yes, it's a real effect resulting in causing a measurable speed up and can be reproduced at will: Try opening a large file with Notepad on a contemporary machine. The window must not be full screen. When loaded, mark all text using the mouse (the keyboard works as well, it just needs more manual skill). While still holding the button down (and marking) move ...


50

Yes, Windows 95 really was released on August 24, 1995; I still have the special issue of The Times that heralded the event. But I distinctly remember thinking that it was late, back at that time. That’s not surprising: Microsoft had been trumpeting the release of the next version of Windows for a long time, and there was widespread coverage in the media ...


50

It turned out that configuring my own forward HTTP proxy was actually really simple! Here's how I did it. First, I placed the following nginx configuration file in /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/: server { listen 81; location / { resolver 8.8.8.8; proxy_http_version 1.1; proxy_pass https://$host$request_uri; } } Then, on the Window 95 machine, ...


39

It wasn't just Windows 95, but Windows 3.x as well, even though they work very differently. Other answers talk about pre-emptive multitasking, so let's first clarify this: Window 3.x was using cooperative multitasking where each app would release the cpu for the other apps to use it. Windows 95 uses pre-emptive multitasking where each app is allocated a ...


30

The CD media for OSR (OEM Service Releases) are generally all the same; there is no unique code on the disc. Imagine what a problem this would be for commercial users with multiple machines to support - they wouldn't want to archive multiple copies of the media. Making the key unique to the disk doesn't add any protection if the disc image is easily ...


29

CDs are made by pressing, having a new master made is expensive so the content of the disk would rarely be changed, certainly not for a single copy. Yes there are recordable CDs now but they were not common at the time windows 95 was released, cost more in bulk than pressing and generally have worse longevity. Even for media that is not pressed making a ...


28

That latest web browser I am able to find is K-Meleon 74 Windows 9x Edition. It was created in 2014, when the Pale Moon engine (Goanna) was backported for Windows 2000. It requires KernelEx (and the latest updates) and a rather beefy old machine to run. You could also experiment with other later browser versions on top of KernelEx, as it adds NT support to ...


26

I have not tried any of these, not having a Windows 98 system, but a bit of research reveals: Internet Explorer 6 SP1 was the last IE, in 2001. Firefox 2 was the last Firefox in 2006. Netscape 8 (2005) or Netscape 9 (2007) are available here. Opera 10 (2009) seems to be the last available, here. Safari and Chrome never supported Windows 98. Browsers ...


25

The reason is because of how WM_TIMER is limited to 15.6ms intervals by default. If you call SetTimer() with a 1ms interval it will still be called in 15.6ms intervals. WM_TIMER drives a lot of stuff in Win32 applications like network packet processing and such. Moving the mouse causes WM_TIMER events to fire more often on Win95. So some applications will ...


24

These are Distribution Media Format disks, storing 1.68 MB of data instead of the usual 1.44 MB (on high-density 3.5” disks). There are a couple of strategies you can use: You can create floppies with the original contents of the installation disks. If you’re running Windows, WinImage is supposed to be able to write such images to floppies. Under Linux, ...


20

The very first step of an attack is to probe the target for platform. Pentesting applications such as metasploit have much more numerous and varied techniques to breach Windows 98 as opposed to the newer Windows versions. By extension, most malware in the wild will also check for platform. In fact, much of that malware has its origins in Metasploit, ...


20

Raymond Chen from Microsoft has a great answer on his blog: One danger of the MsgWaitForMultipleObjects function is calling it when there are already messages waiting to be processed, because MsgWaitForMultipleObjects returns only when there is a new event in the queue. His blog is a great read!


18

It very much depends on what you're trying to do - Lynx's latest release is from 2018, runs on Win95, and is very lightweight, but, you know, lacks graphics. I also use Dillo on old machines when I just need Wikipedia. (Yeah, it does not have nice prebuilt Win binaries as far as I can tell.) // would've like to comment, but I lack the reputation!


18

For a long time (starting late 1992/ early 1993), what was to become Windows 95 went under the name of "Chicago". Only in september 1994 (beta 1.4 / build 189), did it become Windows 95. Microsoft must have been reasonably sure they were going to release in 1995 by then. Early Chicago Usability Testing builds - 1992/93 Last Chicago labeled build - ...


17

AppleWin was announced in August 1994, so it turns out yours isn’t the first non-commercial emulator developed for Windows. It was made available by April 1995 if not earlier.


17

Notepad (at least originally) was implemented as a simple wrapper around the Windows EDIT control. EDIT is not really designed to handle large amounts of text -- it stores text in a single block of memory allocated via LocalAlloc (which, at least for 16-bit versions of Windows, means that it can't handle more than 64K of text in a single control, and in ...


16

Install Cygwin using setup-legacy.exe from the Cygwin Time Machine, pointing it at the cygwin-legacy URL, which pins the package versions to the last set released for Cygwin 1.5, the last release for Windows 9x. The Cygwin Time Machine serves frozen-in-place versions of Cygwin, so it will work as well today as it did back then, which was pretty good, ...


15

In the Windows world, the MAX_PATH 260-character limit dates back to the introduction of the Win32 APIs; it is for example documented in GetWindowsDirectory. Before that, Windows (at least in version 3) documented a 144-character limit; see for example GetSystemDirectory. As far as why the path limit is 260 characters, the general answer you’ll find on the ...


14

Well, turns out the Wikipedia article has the answer already: WinG would also perform a graphics hardware/driver profiling test on the first execution of the program in order to determine the best way to manipulate the graphics hardware. This test showed a window full of red curved lines, sections of which would wobble as performance was tested. Once WinG ...


14

Arguably, this is a common bug in early software based on an event-processing loop rather than a Windows bug: if some DD-paths of the loop only process a single event, then every time when two events are generated simultaneously, only one is processed and the other gets stuck. Moving the mouse generates more incoming events and restarts the loop. "Mouse move"...


13

Windows 95 and 98 IO.SYS/WINBOOT.SYS consists of three parts: the initial loader, the payload and the device configuration manager executable. The initial loader (MSLOAD) comprises the first three or four0 512-byte sectors of the file; the first sector begins with the signature MZ, the second starts with the signature BJ and the last ends with the signature ...


12

Key code verification was done by installer - without connecting to any server to verify if the key is valid / blacklisted. According to ViennaXP's answer on this thread on BetaArchive, Windows 95/NT keys must fit these constraints: the first digit of the first 5-digit block must be a 1 or 2 the first 3 digits of the 7-digit blick must be 000 the digit sum ...


12

(The question How could one say that older operating systems are more vulnerable? on Security Stack Exchange (linked by Stephen Kitt in the comments) provides a more in-depth answer, but I will try to provide a high-level answer here as well.) Yes and no, mostly no. Yes in the sense Windows 9x is vulnerable to most of the exploits patched by the various ...


11

When you used dd, did you capture it from the first physical sector? Or did you merely grab the volume of interest? If you did it on \\.\Volume{$$$$$$$$-$$$$-....}, then you only got C:, not the whole disk. You need to do it on \\.\PhysicalDrive# (whatever # it is) to get everything - including the Master Boot Record (MBR) which is in the first physical ...


11

Mostly no. Pre-XP versions of Windows are certainly vulnerable to targeted attacks, such as you'd see from Metasploit -- if you're the sort of high-value target that attracts such attacks, don't run Windows 98. However, most malware isn't that flexible. Instead, it's programmed to run on popular versions of Windows (typically XP or newer) and nothing else:...


11

For works "made for hire" in the USA after 1978, copyright extends for 95 years after the date of first publication. So for practical purposes, it depends entirely on when (or if) Microsoft decides to put them in the public domain.


11

You can use the Web rendereing proxy, displaying modern web pages inside a GIF and imagemap. It works well, though Google Captcha often thinks (rightfully) that it is not a human controlling the web browser and won't let you through. Alternately (and more useful for other activities than web browsing), you can try VNC connection. Although you probably have ...


10

Here's a BBC News article describing the midnight retail availability of Windows 95 on 24th August 1995. This Mashable article claims to show a photograph of a buyer at the Australian launch on the same date. It gives a November date for Japan.


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