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34

The Meltdown attack is about figuring out what's in protected memory (typically, kernel memory) by arranging for it to be speculatively read, and then looking for residual side effects after the speculative read is discarded. MS-DOS is immune to Meltdown because it doesn't do memory protection. If you want to figure out what's in RAM, you can simply look. ...


23

I have not tried any of these, not having a Windows 98 system, but a bit of research reveals: Internet Explorer 6 SP1 was the last IE, in 2001. Firefox 2 was the last Firefox in 2006. Netscape 8 (2005) or Netscape 9 (2007) are available here. Opera 10 (2009) seems to be the last available, here. Safari and Chrome never supported Windows 98. Browsers ...


23

That latest web browser I am able to find is K-Meleon 74 Windows 9x Edition. It was created in 2014, when the Pale Moon engine (Goanna) was backported for Windows 2000. It requires KernelEx (and the latest updates) and a rather beefy old machine to run. You could also experiment with other later browser versions on top of KernelEx, as it adds NT support to ...


20

A Duron of this era is a cut-down version of a Thunderbird Athlon, and is broadly comparable to a Coppermine (Pentium III) Celeron. Paired with the right audio/video hardware, it's absolutely capable of playing most 1990s DOS games, although a few (and an even larger number of 1980s games) may have trouble with it running too fast. It will also run Windows ...


20

The very first step of an attack is to probe the target for platform. Pentesting applications such as metasploit have much more numerous and varied techniques to breach Windows 98 as opposed to the newer Windows versions. By extension, most malware in the wild will also check for platform. In fact, much of that malware has its origins in Metasploit, ...


17

There are three basic ways: a) Get a LAN card and setup a workgroup with all drives shared and access whatever needs to be backuped to your new machine. This is quite dependant on installed software. But chances are good that some NE2000 compatible card driver is already installed. You have to check what I/O bus system is used and buy the apropriate card. ...


16

The Windows 98 memory manager only supports a maximum of 1GB. This amount of memory was considered beyond huge for the time, and by the time people commonly had that much or more memory, Microsoft expected people to be using either newer versions of Windows 9x, or Windows NT. From Raymond Chen's blog The Old New Thing: Windows 98 bumped the limit to 1GB ...


14

I might have found a stable way to limit Windows 98 to use only 1Gb of RAM with HimemX: Install Windows 98 with 1Gb of RAM or less; Download himemxfrom https://sourceforge.net/projects/himemx/; Extract himemx.zip and copy himemx.exe to C:\Windows\ under Windows 98; Open the Run dialog box (Windows + R), type sysedit and press Enter; Open the file C:\CONFIG....


14

Presuming a totally fresh installation of everything and access to all the needed installation media. Also, presuming that the Shuttle X PC can read the SD card through the SD to IDE adapter. Planning Partition Sizes The size of the SD is likely to cause the most problems. Windows XP system requirements is for at least 1.5GB of available hard disk space. ...


14

For the most part you're correct. Neither MS-DOS nor Windows 95/98/ME implemented a security model that would not be impacted by the Meltdown or Spectre vulnerabilities. MS-DOS didn't protect memory at all, Windows 9x's separation of user and "kernel" memory was just to protect against user processes accidentally from modifying memory outside of their ...


13

(The question How could one say that older operating systems are more vulnerable? on Security Stack Exchange (linked by Stephen Kitt in the comments) provides a more in-depth answer, but I will try to provide a high-level answer here as well.) Yes and no, mostly no. Yes in the sense Windows 9x is vulnerable to most of the exploits patched by the various ...


12

It very much depends on what you're trying to do - Lynx's latest release is from 2018, runs on Win95, and is very lightweight, but, you know, lacks graphics. I also use Dillo on old machines when I just need Wikipedia. (Yeah, it does not have nice prebuilt Win binaries as far as I can tell.) // would've like to comment, but I lack the reputation!


11

Mostly no. Pre-XP versions of Windows are certainly vulnerable to targeted attacks, such as you'd see from Metasploit -- if you're the sort of high-value target that attracts such attacks, don't run Windows 98. However, most malware isn't that flexible. Instead, it's programmed to run on popular versions of Windows (typically XP or newer) and nothing else:...


10

Articles Q190355 and Q195737 previously available on microsoft.com provided a little documentation about the .scf script file format: Example 1: Show Desktop (from Q190355): [Shell] Command=2 IconFile=explorer.exe,3 [Taskbar] Command=ToggleDesktop Example 2: View Channels (from Q195737): [Shell] Command=3 IconFile=shdocvw.dll,-118 [IE] Command=Channels ...


10

File System Windows 98 typically uses FAT32, whereas later versions of Windows support NTFS. While it should recognize a flash drive at the low-level hardware no matter what file system is installed, it will likely not show it 100% correctly if it is using NTFS instead of FAT32. My advice is to format the flash drive on a newer computer/OS using FAT32 (...


8

Windows 95 and 98 require an x86-type CPU (and more generally, a PC, with BIOS, etc.), so they can't run on PowerPC G3-based computers without an emulation layer of some sort.


8

This flaw does not affect MS-DOS because there is no kernel protection to subvert. It affects any protected mode Windows of any era that has a speculative CPU. However, nothing before the Pentium Pro speculatively executed so a regular Pentium or below does not exhibit the bug. Therefore it is unlikely to affect a substantial number of real machines. ...


8

You will generally find that the all ones method works for Microsoft software released before 2001-2003. Microsoft's 25-character product keys (which were alpha-numeric and cryptographic in nature) first appeared in the Windows XP and Office XP. Of course, not all of Microsoft's products switched to the 25-character product key approach right away, but as ...


7

SCF files are just another form of shortcuts to access various system functions with syntax identical to *.ini files. They are handled by shell32.dll. Parameter 'Command' determines how is the file handled. Possible values: Posts internal message to windows main process (systray.exe). At a glance it doesn't seem like message with this ID (0x4C8) is handled ...


7

You are probably not linking to the winsock library. Depending on the winsock version you are targetting, you should use either ws2_32.lib for Winsock 2 (which you seem to be using), or wsock32.lib for Winsock 1.1


7

This is a rather broad question, but the answers are inter-related so here goes. Should I build a Win95 or Win98 computer in order to also play DOS games (System Shock, Teranova...)? This was common in the late 90s: PCs mostly ran Windows 95 or 98 then, but still ran DOS games too. I know some DOS games plays too fast on systems that are too powefull, ...


7

Your best option is probably to skip Windows entirely. A Linux livecd will be able to read your filesystem, and has the drivers to use your USB ports built-in. My personal preference would be for System Rescue CD - it requires a Pentium or newer, but other than that, should support almost any hardware.


6

I had one of these for quite a while (better part of a decade) running in a box that I used as a household print/file server. I had it running Fedora Linux (started with Core 5, upgraded to 9 later on) without issues. It did have a (small) CPU fan. I got the machine second-hand from a garage sale, so I probably added the fan myself (it's been a while, can'...


6

Solution: BIOS Update. I didn't want to update the BIOS. As far as I remember, BIOS updates were more risky back then so I wanted to do this as last option. I downloaded the BIOS Update and installed it. After that I tried installing Win98SE again and it worked perfectly. My Mainboard has a Phoenix BIOS. Using a Phoenix BIOS make sure the first 11 digits ...


6

I remember there being a folder installed with VisualBasic 4 or 5 that was full of those icons... I remember there being all the stock new, open, save, print, cut, copy, paste, etc. and some more esoteric ones like flags and smileys and chain links... I don't have access to my old MSDN disk from back then (they are in storage) but if you can dig up a copy ...


6

One solution is to use a USB-to-Floppy interface adapter. One brand of these is Gotek. You can even mount it in a drive bay, perhaps in place of the original floppy drive. The computer will think it's reading a floppy disk when it's actually reading a floppy image file on a USB stick.


5

Firstly, many old computers had problems with booting from CD; It was either unsupported or very buggy. Secondly, even if booting from CD would work on that particular Aptiva, i doubt that booting from a recorded CD would - it has something to do with the way data is written to the disc (many pre-1997 (the year recordable CDs were introduced) CD-ROMs have ...


5

I checked on Windows 98, and the behaviour I saw didn’t match your description (or my earlier answer). Basically, whether you hold down the mouse button or not, menus stay open as long as you don’t click elsewhere or hit a key. Sub-menus open either immediately when you click on their parent menu entry, or after a short delay if the mouse pointer hovers ...


5

Not dual-boot, but you could track down an old copy of Virtual PC for the Mac by Microsoft. VPC was an x86 emulator for the Mac OS X PowerPC line of computers and supported Windows 98 out of the box. I can't recall if it supported '95 as well since it has been several years since I've used it, but I know that it did work reasonably well with '98. Now as far ...


5

I was a system builder in that era -- '90s. Probably the only MS-DOS games you'll have trouble with are '80s ones in CGA or EGA which were dependent on system clock speeds. Nibbler is an example of this type of game, which used the time that it took the screen to redraw to slow down the game. The fix for that 286-era game was the 'Turbo' function of the ...


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