101

The message hasn’t gone anywhere. What actually changed is something else. The text message first appeared in MS-DOS 6.0 and said ‘Starting MS-DOS...’. It served two purposes: first, it confirmed that MSLOAD has successfully completed reading the DOS kernel from IO.SYS and initialisation is now underway. Second, it signalled the user that they can now press ...


33

Since the price seems to be an issue, I'll suggest a cheap alternative to hard drives. A IDE Compact Flash card reader with a 4GB or 8GB compact flash card is a cheap combo, still sold (less than 10 euros for the reader on Amazon), consumes not much power (which could be an issue with a hard drive) The capacity shouldn't be an issue either. For less that 50 ...


17

I have not tried it, but according to the Wikipedia page on the Host Protected Area, one use case was to use large disks on systems whose BIOS could not cope with them. It would therefore seem to be a case of picking a likely-looking modern disk and doing a suitable hdparm -Np command on it from Linux to set a permanent HPA limit. For example, if you wanted ...


10

When using a single core, code which disables interrupts and then performs a sequence of memory operations can guarantee that they will be performed atomically. Additionally, many operations like "inc" would be essentially guaranteed to be atomic in the absence of a page fault. Prior to the introduction of a "compare exchange" ...


9

HostWinBootDrv is the easiest to explain: it has to do with disk compression, i.e. DoubleSpace/DriveSpace. What DriveSpace does is create a file with a name like DRVSPACE.nnn (with nnn being a three-digit number) that contains the compressed contents of the disk. The compressed file system is assigned the drive letter of the partition containing the file, ...


8

Theoretically, it might be possible. But practical considerations should not be so easily dismissed. What @supercat says is true. But part of another reason is already contained in your question: the VMM was not merely a host for applications written against the DOS/BIOS interfaces, it was also itself a client of those same non-reentrant interfaces. This was ...


6

You mentioned copying files into the %WINDIR%\SYSTEM\IOSUBSYS directory (including VMM.VXD), but nothing about the %WINDIR%\SYSTEM\VMM32 directory. The former, as the name suggests, contains only individual block device drivers (port drivers, VxDs for hard disks, CD-ROM drives, etc.). It’s the latter directory that is supposed to contain core VMM service ...


6

The question doesn’t really describe the circumstances in enough detail to confidently tell what is actually going on. Despite this, there are still a number of things that can be tried to remedy the problem. Climbing the ladder of abstraction, they are as follows: Check the BIOS. In many BIOSes there is a setting in which the user can specify what kinds of ...


4

According to https://www.philscomputerlab.com/windows-98-maximum-hard-drive-capacity.html Win 98 supports harddrives up to 127 GB so your 60 GB drive should work fine. But never buy a HDD second hand!


2

Winbootdir points to the directory that DOS startup files are in. It can be different to Windir. Windir points to the directory that the user's registry is in. On a network this can be different to where windows is installed. Winbootdir is used if there is no config.sys/autoexec.bat, to load the drivers like himem.sys, ifs$hlp.sys, and co. It could be on ...


2

I can only guess that it might be something like parts of the firmware being stored on the HDD that could get nuked by the Windows installer. At least I have a Compaq DeskPro 486 that had a nice clicky graphical BIOS Setup utility (resembling current UEFI interfaces, completely out of place in the 90's) and that one was stored in a special hidden partition ...


1

For Windows 98; boot a linux distro and partition the disk giving Windows only the 32GByte. Then boot Win98 and install. It will work. The fact that there's more disk past the end of the partition only matters to fdisk (which will crash if you open it); but you don't run fdisk from your hard disk.


1

My experience has been that if you try to use a hard drive with a capacity beyond what the hardware will support you just get the capacity the hardware supports. The important thing is the size (3.5" or 2.5") and the interface (IDE aka PATA or SATA.) I strongly suspect you're dealing with a 2.5" IDE. Before you spend any money on it, though--...


1

This won't be the last one, but for Mozilla Firefox, the last version supporting Windows 98 (without hacks) was Firefox 2.0.0.20, released on December 18, 2008, support for98/Me was removed on Firefox 3.


1

I get a feeling it's not going to work. The VIA 8237 had AC'97 audio, but the 8237A has HD Audio (the successor standard to AC'97, which was published in 2004). To the best of my knowledge, there are no HD Audio drivers of any kind for Win98. If VIA says they have a download available, there's a good chance that they're mistakenly routing you to the AC'97 ...


1

Ok, I found no way to manually get Installer 2.0 on my virtual box win98 SE installation. But I found this: Unofficial Windows 98 SE service pack 2.1e After installing that, I was able to install .NET 2.0 redístributable without problems. Which means that the prerequisite of Installer 2.0 being on the system is fulfilled after installation of that pack. Edit:...


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