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70

Your images appear to have been generated via emulation, with heavy anti-aliasing that doesn't show what it looked like in reality. Here's Windows 3.1 Write in native VGA resolution without any image processing, captured from PC-Task running on an Amiga 1200:- Here's part of that screen magnified so you can see the individual pixels:- Finally, here's what ...


58

This is a botched version check error message. Windows 1.x was designed to run under MS-DOS 2.0, 3.0 and 3.10; to ensure it only runs under one of these, it performs a version test on its host DOS. Windows does not merely obtain the officially-advertised version number; to ensure the version number is not spoofed, it also tests whether certain fields of the ...


42

Because those were low-resolution bitmap fonts. In Windows 1.01, most fonts were monochrome bitmap fonts, and not particularly high-resolution at that. (There were CONTINUOUSSCALING ‘plotter’ fonts included as well, but Write could not make use of those.) Additionally, Windows did not render any fonts with antialiasing before Windows 95 (with the Microsoft ...


13

It isn't. The examples are comparing apples and oranges. As they cover three different situations/usages: Bitmap Emulation vs. Native Usage vs. Character Emulation The results are based on what hardware is emulated, in what mode and _on which modern device. Lets for simplicity assume the modern screen is a rather average, if not lower end 2560 by 1440. ...


11

Windows 1.0’s Write application doesn’t care about how the text it displays is rendered — it relies on its operating environment to display it. As such, it supports smooth fonts, even though Windows 1.0 itself (and Windows 2.0 etc.) doesn’t. Thus if you run the Write executable in a more modern environment, you’ll see it display anti-aliased text (I don’t ...


9

Those were used by the default desktop color scheme, I think starting in Windows 3.1 (it might have debuted in 3.0). The “Sky Blue” color was the default Title Bar color; it’s unmistakable. The default scheme also used the “Cream” color for the Window Background. “Medium Grey” was essential to create pleasant edges of the new “3D” buttons - I remember this ...


6

Presumably inertia, of the same kind that had MS-DOS prompt for the current date and time at boot long after RTC with state preserved across power cycles became a standard feature. Alternatively, the designers might have decided the effort is not worth it. Switching between two different messages would necessitate creating an API that queried the ...


5

I believe it's because that version of Internet Explorer does not support Server Name Indication, which is part of the TLS protocol which allows a secure handshake to be established when multiple domains with different certificates are hosted at the same IP. If badssl.com is hosted on shared hosting, then I think this explains your issue. On Webmasters Stack ...


5

start /min command works fine at any Windows 9x command line (in an existing command prompt window, a batch file, the Run window) and will start the command prompt minimised; although the start command itself may open a console window in the foreground. If you instead launch the command prompt from a PIF file, this can be configured in the file properties ...


3

Not all PCs in for example Win98 era had ATX power supplies, as many still had AT power supplies. AT power supplies need to be switched off by user with a physical mains switch, they can't be turned off in software.


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