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41 votes
Accepted

In what ways was the Windows NT POSIX implementation unsuited to real use?

In what specific ways was the POSIX implementation unsuited to real use? It wasn’t unsuited, but it’s important to understand what was certified. In order to meet requirements for certain US ...
Stephen Kitt's user avatar
38 votes
Accepted

Since when does Windows support forward slash as path separator?

TL;DR: Windows did not explicitly support both, but DOS did since 2.0 The answer is rather a clear "yes but" (*1): DOS 2.0 and later supported both ways, thus all DOS functions will work ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 225k
19 votes

In what ways was the Windows NT POSIX implementation unsuited to real use?

You would be interested in this video, in which the vlogger installs the POSIX subsystem for Windows NT 4.0sp6 (after previously having tested the version for NT 3.1). It’s a summary of a livestream ...
Davislor's user avatar
  • 8,745
14 votes

Since when does Windows support forward slash as path separator?

A quick experiment in 86Box made me believe that this is supported starting from the very beginning with Windows 1.0. At least notepad and its standard file open dialog would accept paths delimited by ...
DL444's user avatar
  • 311
11 votes

Since when does Windows support forward slash as path separator?

Since MS-DOS 2.0: From https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Backslash#Filenames MS-DOS 2 copied the hierarchical file system from Unix and thus used the forward slash, but (possibly on the insistence of IBM)...
Mark Williams's user avatar
10 votes

Windows War Strategy Game

Could it have been Winwar II 2.0 or 3.0? I used to play it on Windows 95, but I remember it having a very distinct Windows 3.1 feeling to it. It was basically a computer version of the board game Axis ...
jkej's user avatar
  • 201
8 votes

Windows War Strategy Game

Possible match for Civilization: Early 90's, multi-platform including PC Large map of Europe covering 75% of screen Plays Handel's Sarabande in D Minor as a MIDI track (PC version) Not a WWI/WWII ...
Eight-Bit Guru's user avatar
7 votes

Windows War Strategy Game

Here are two shareware games that I found: Fields of Battle The Great War: 1914-1918 All images courtesy of MobyGames.
Noel Whitemore's user avatar
7 votes

In what ways was the Windows NT POSIX implementation unsuited to real use?

Having tried to use it, I found it had a major fault that rendered it unusable. Delete file while in use did not function; and quite a few applications from the era expected this to work; with them ...
Joshua's user avatar
  • 1,839
7 votes
Accepted

What device access APIs were there in Windows 9x?

The low-level Win32 userspace device access API in Windows 9x is actually not all that different from the one in Windows NT: given a path pointing to a device node (which starts with \\.\), you can ...
user3840170's user avatar
  • 23.1k
6 votes

Windows War Strategy Game

I believe you're thinking of the shareware game World Empire IV, which was a popular turn-based strategy game for Windows 3 and up. The objective was to obliterate all your opponents and take over the ...
knol's user avatar
  • 12.5k
4 votes

Windows War Strategy Game

I don't know if it's the game you're looking for (it might be too old), but I have fond memories of playing World War II in Western Europe by W R Hutsell (and the sibling American Civil War game).
Otik's user avatar
  • 41
4 votes

What device access APIs were there in Windows 9x?

For 3D rendering specifically, Windows display drivers expose a so called Direct3D Device Driver Interface (https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/drivers/display/direct3d). DDI did exist ...
DmytroL's user avatar
  • 2,172
3 votes

In what ways was the Windows NT POSIX implementation unsuited to real use?

TL;DR: Those claims do not add up. The whole issue is, to use nice words, an urban myth. It ticks all the boxes about MS being an evil conspiracy but does not deliver any validation, neither ...
Raffzahn's user avatar
  • 225k
3 votes

Windows screensaver showing "natural selection"

This really looks like Microsoft Plus! For Windows 95. It had a lot of cool screensavers, including the one you're talking about, plus a train station, wild animal before it was cool (yes Mac OS X ...
Olivier's user avatar
  • 659
3 votes

In what ways was the Windows NT POSIX implementation unsuited to real use?

I was working on porting unix software to windows NT at the time. Strict POSIX was never a useful standard as it did not include network access or graphical outout. Unix systems that supported POSIX ...
Ian Ringrose's user avatar
3 votes

Identify a 90's game with a car with a mounted cannon

Could this be Quarantine? Quarantine matches a lot of what you've mentioned there, You drive a yellow taxi, but is covered in blood in all the promotional artwork, and yellow+red = brown. It is 3rd ...
DewiW's user avatar
  • 31
2 votes

Identify a 90's game with a car with a mounted cannon

I believe you're thinking of Vangers, an overhead action-adventure by KD LAB who would later go on to make Perimeter, which has a similar graphical style and some references like 'spiral' ...
knol's user avatar
  • 12.5k
2 votes

Did Windows 2.x actually receive support until end of 2001?

AFAIK MS started setting formal support lifecycles for Windows in February 2001. Before then things like MSRC security bulletins did not really exist.
Yuhong Bao's user avatar
1 vote

How did Citrix for Windows NT 3.1 work?

There wasn't one. Citrix WinFrame began with NT 3.5 and 3.51, I believe. There is some info on how it works on ToastyTech: http://toastytech.com/guis/remotecitrix.html The earlier version ran on OS/2 ...
Liam Proven's user avatar
  • 1,255
1 vote
Accepted

Windows screensaver showing "natural selection"

I strongly suspect that what I was looking at was a very early cut of "Spore" by Electronic arts, as described by https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spore_(2008_video_game) and various videos on ...
Mark Morgan Lloyd's user avatar
1 vote

Why did DOS-based Windows require HIMEM.SYS to boot?

It is entirely possible that it required himem simply because it had to support himem, to start with. I.e. if you have himem.sys loaded, then windows can't just look into e820 and map all the ...
stsp's user avatar
  • 161

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