81

The short version is that X11 was the first widely-disseminated version, and it turned out to be good enough to remain as-is for thirty years. X is the X Window System, which at its core is a protocol; the number identifies the version of the protocol. X1 was released in 1984 inside MIT, and quickly evolved to X9 in 1985; an external port to RT/PC required ...


20

I suppose what you are looking for are graphics terminals: systems that receive display instructions over a (relatively) slow connection, like a network or a serial line, and construct and display an image based on that information. The earliest such graphics terminal I am aware of is the IBM 2250 from 1964, which connected to an IBM 360 mainframe. One such ...


11

Because of the fact that it is well-documented, widely-supported on modern systems, and emulates hardware that was an early adopter of the X Window System in the mid-1980s, I would suggest that a suitable software stack would use the MAME/MESS emulator for the Apollo DN workstations. MESS emulator Domain/OS xwm There are instructions on the MESS Wiki for ...


10

The PLATO system, starting with PLATO IV (1972), had 512x512 bitmap terminals that connected to a mainframe (CDC Cyber). Many early iterations of graphical game genres (MUD, FPS, ...) were programmed on the PLATO IV system. You can try out a PLATO IV system on an emulated CDC Cyber here, if you install the required terminal emulator.


9

Back in the 1970s, you could run a program on a DECsystem-10 that would display graphics on a DEC GT-42 (which was basically a PDP 11/10 with a video display). The GT-42 was connected via serial link, probably 20mA loop, since it was several hundred yards away from the DECsystem-10. Structurally, this is the same arrangement as an X-terminal (not xterm, ...


6

According to the Wikipedia article, in 1985, X6 was released and DEC showed interest for its Ultrix workstations. In 1986, X10 was release, and in 1987, they switched to X11. Other sources (lost the Google results, sorry) put the switch to X11 in 1986. Be that as it may, there's a number of Ultrix tapes of various versions on Bitsavers. Version 3.0 already ...


5

As I recall, X10 was mostly done as part of the MIT 'Athena' project with a lot of contribution from DEC WSL. MIT is were we got our source tape from. At that time, we would have been running VAXStation IIs running a somewhat locally modified BSD 4.2/4.3 and Sun-3 running SunOS 3.5. So you'd be looking at a pre-POSIX BSD build environment (pcc or SunCC ...


3

The way the question is worded, several answers are possible. Is it about remote stations capable of displaying glaphical output? Then essentially every graphics terminal/display/workstation qualifies, which would make even the very fist graphical terminal, the IBM 2250 a valid answer. In fact, it would as well make any other graphic output device, like a ...


2

Programs written in the PostScript graphics programming language (1984) typically ran on a Motorola 68000 CPU remotely from the host computer.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible