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74

A number of components still present in Firefox date back to the first code drop in 1998 and were probably present before that. One of these is nsprpub, the NetScape Portable Runtime library, and it has some code snippets which are still identical to those in the first public CVS commit (as verifiable from the VCS archives). For example, ptthread.c’s ...


59

Yes, it’s true, as explained in Wikipedia’s entries for the Mozilla application suite and Firefox. More accurately, Firefox is a descendant of Netscape Navigator; most of Firefox has been rewritten in one way or another since the days of Navigator. Most of Netscape Navigator (or rather, Communicator) was released as open source in 1998; this was then ...


43

Same as today - beige and light gray goes with every style, no matter if a business desk or your living room. They are a simple non-statement, the least offensive colours to most people, thus not keeping anyone from buying. There have been endless attempts to sell stylish machinery thru all times, but looking back will reveal that the most stylish are ...


29

The choice of beige for the plastic cases used on popular 1980s retrocomputers was not arbitrary. As a color for a popular, mass-market, personal computer, it originated with the Apple ][, where it was specifically chosen by the designer, Jerry Manock. In 1977, Steve Jobs hired Manock, a professional designer, to create the Apple II around Wozniak's ...


21

According to the "Beige box" entry of Wikipedia, many early personal computers and dedicated word processors [...] were usually beige or similar colors like off white or ecru. These colors were presumably chosen to allow the machines to blend inconspicuously into a variety of settings, especially among similarly colored cubicles and office equipment.


16

Firefox has seen a great deal of development over the last 22 years, both in maintaining the original code and in re-writing large portions. Currently, much of Firefox is being converted from C++ to modern Rust code. That said, there are certain core pieces to the browser that maintain code from the time it was open-sourced. A reasonable place to look is ...


12

Nostalgia Nerd produced a video on this very subject very recently. Most of the reasons he cites are already answered here. But one interesting find was that Germany and some other European countries went as far as to write it into their health and safety workplace laws that 'light-value' colors must be used in office computing equipment (7:00 into the video)...


7

TL;DR; What was the DEC CR11 card reader 'compressed Hollerith code' for? It essentially allows to read arbitrary card data as distinct 8 bit values, as long they follow the 'Hollerith scheme' of decimal encoding marked up with zones. Long Read: Compressed Hollerith: 5 rows are delivered as-is, and the other 7 (rows 1 to 7) are delivered as a 3-bit ...


6

I am trying to find the source code for the earliest implementation of the stack data structure in C There is no stack data structure in C. Look through the language specification and you won't find it there. If you were a programmer and you wanted a stack, you had to implement your own. If you go back to the beginnings of C and look at all the code that ...


5

The AGC, at least, didn't employ any such indirection. Calls to subroutines in other banks were performed via the BANKCALL routine (TC BANKCALL followed by a CADR pseudo-instruction containing the target label). CADR encoded the destination bank and address directly. If a routine moves because previous content in the same bank got longer or shorter, all ...


4

How come there are C compilers not written by Bell Labs? ;-) As far as I am aware, there is no prohibition on producing your own implementation of a programming language based on the description of that programming language. You can't copy someone else's implementation without their permission. You don't need to reverse-engineer an implementation if ...


3

As mentioned in the comments, data can’t be entirely hidden in C, there is no concept of “public” v. “private” members of data structures. Members can be hidden in practice using pointers to opaque data structures (see for example FILE), but that’s only a “gentleman’s agreement”. When looking for early implementations in C, your best bet is to dig in the ...


3

Slightly bananas answer: MC68000. Okay, I know, it's not a graphics chip. But, you can take some inspiration from the Xerox Alto, which would presumably have been a somewhat familiar source of inspiration to somebody working in graphical workstations in 1980. Since the Alto didn't have access to a modern off the shelf RAMDAC for displaying the contents ...


2

I know they sold one system to the Mitre Corporation, a big defense contractor; I believe it was for research into new computer architectures.


2

One option not mentioned yet, was that we did nothing and lived with the bug as it was.


2

My understanding is that the stack is provided at the architectural level, eg it is built in to the processor in the form of a stack pointer and relevant operators. It is not a language level concept, in the way that other data structures may be.


1

I'm probably repeating other posts, but let me try and summarize. There is no 'stack' in the definition of the C language An implementation of C very likely uses a stack for activation records (holding local variables and return addresses, for example) -- also known as a 'call stack'. The C standard library has no 'stack' data structure The concept of '...


1

In early nineties, after retirement of mainframe computers in Czechoslovakia, there were many powerfull drum printers left in our computing center. If someone is interrested how we managed to print files from IBM PC-XT on mainframe printers, look at http://www.vitsoft.info/ecprint.htm


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