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40

If (and only if) your audio player is battery powered, and your Spectrum is the 48K or 128K toastrack model, try the following procedure, intended to boost the volume of your wave signal, as seen by the Spectrum EAR circuitry: Get one of these audio cables. They are very common. And yes, they are stereo. Why do we need it to be stereo? The trick is that ...


22

MOD is the file extension for SoundTracker modules. SoundTracker and its successors (NoiseTracker and ProTracker predominantly, although there are other derivatives) are sequencers, and load and save files in this format. It was originally designed for games and demo programmers - assembly code to play back the modules was commonly available and worked ...


20

As the sound channels had independent linear 64-step volume control (6 bits + mute setting), by calibration and splitting sample bits for one 14bit waveform across two channels, two-channel 14bit (stereo) sound could in principle be improvised using all 4 channels. This would be done by playing A coarse part of the waveform generated from the higher 8 bits ...


19

Short answer: It's a holdover from the Warez scene, and more specifically around the time of the Commodore Amiga when pirates had ready access to music software. Back in the day (and less often nowadays), pirates "signed" cracked software with their name or emblem or something to that effect. As more and more pirates entered the scene and piracy became more ...


17

You need to use OpenMSX, and get the system ROMs for the machine in question. Then run OpenMSX, set the machine to the FS-A1WSX. There's a little menu button at the top left of the OpenMSX window. In there, set your tape to the WAV file. Then: 10 M$ = "E4E8O3G16G32R32G2G4R4O4C8D8E8F8G2G8F8E8F4E8D8E4D8C4" 20 PLAY M$+M$ The listing above is the content of ...


17

I've confirmed that mcleod_ideafix's method is reliable for regular tape images. Here is a shell script to do (effectively) the same thing: #!/bin/bash # wav2differential.sh - convert mono game tape audio to 2× stereo # usage: wav2differential.sh infile.wav # (creates infile-differential.wav) # scruss - 2016-06-07 # method by ‘mcleod_ideafix’; ...


16

According to the very same link you provided: To perform this feat, Oktalyzer loaded eight channels in memory, mixed them in real time down to four channels, and sent the result to the Amiga sound chip. This was a processor-intensive task which degraded sound quality, but was more than made up for with doubled channels. Oktalyzer could also be run ...


13

SID6851 specification quotes: Cut-off frequency variation may occur from chip to chip due to process variations, and power supply voltage. Capacitor values and voltage regulation can compensate for these variations We're talking about a 30-some years old chips, the manufacturing process wasn't very consistent back then, and also MOS was known to ...


13

In the case of the Famicom, the extra chip(s) on the cartridge would contain some additional sound generators. The cartridge slot contained a pin that would accept audio from the game cartridge and mix it with the other audio coming from the console and send it all to the TV. Pinouts: https://wiki.nesdev.com/w/index.php/Cartridge_connector Notice that the ...


13

The NES cartridge connector does not have expansion sound. However, there's an expansion port on the bottom of the NES which does, although this connector was never used by any commercial games. JAL's answer describes a mod involving soldering a resistor between pins 3 and 9 of the expansion connector. This actually does work. Pin 3 is the expansion ...


12

None of the GameBoy series machine has a Z80, but instead a Sharp LR35902, which runs a "GBZ80" instruction set, which is if I'm not mistaking similar but incompatible with the genuine Z80, as it lacks the two registers sets (much like the 8080) and other instructions. Just like the 2A03 in the NES, the CPU is in the same chip as the sound generation ...


9

Yes, games like Rescue Raiders and Silent Service used interrupts to queue music and sound effects while other things were happening on the screen. Perhaps the best example of the technique is Skyfox, which had music playing during the frenetic dogfight action. The option to have simultaneous graphics and great sound without cycle-counting was one of the ...


9

Black-and-white hi-res from the 1040 STE on a VGA monitor should work with a direct connection and no tricky electronics at all (just the adapter cable) Atari VGA GND 13----X---- GND ---------4 GND Sense 4----+ +--------------2 green ...


8

The problem you have is that most home computers of that era output TV standard signals which VGA is not. As you've mentioned there needs to be some conversion from one standard to the other. A popular solution that I happen to use is the Gonbes GBS-8200/GBS-8220 boards. They aren't perfect and some people hate them but they are reasonably cheap and I think ...


8

The good news is the next few steps are easy. Most (all?) of the MSX emulators include a "virtual tape" that can open a WAV file. openMSX does for sure. It's right in the instructions for the emulator. I don't know enough about MSX to know if it stored programs as text or in tokenized format, but in either case, once it is loaded you can use the "virtual ...


8

[Do over answer] Based on your clue that an Atari monitor has matching coloured inputs I looked up the Atari 8-bit video connector, compared to the C64: It is likely you have an Atari lead rather than a Commodore one. So your four signals are intended to be (1) luminance; (2) audio; (3) composite video; (4) chroma where available. Plugging that cable into ...


7

The Wikipedia comment is misleading. The Game Boy CPU has several components in one chip, including the Z80-alike CPU core and a sound generator among others. These components may all be in the same chip but they are functionally independent; you don't need the Z80 CPU to be able to produce audio. The Nintendo DS inherited the Game Boy sound generator ...


7

Check this Spectrum tape interface: Pulses A 'pulse' here is either a mark or a space, so 2 pulses makes a complete square wave cycle. Pilot tone: before each block is a sequence of 8063 (header) or 3223 (data) pulses, each of length 2168 T-states. Sync pulses: the pilot tone is followed by two sync pulses of 667 and 735 T-states resp....


7

You have three problems to overcome: Separate sync from composite video or CSYNC into H and V to get an RGBHV output. Upscale/scan double from 15 kHz to the 31 kHz that most VGA monitors accept. Separate out the audio. The $89 Ambery 15Khz RGB CGA to VGA RGBHV Converter Scaler is a device that appears to do the first two, but I have no experience with it. ...


7

I haven't tested this, so I can't vouch for its authenticity, but one guide claims that soldering a 24k to 56k resistor between pins 3 and 9 of the NES expansion connector will "unlock" additional sound channels. Note that this only works on the original release with mono audio out.


6

I found two neat pictures that show the pin order on the AV out port and the AV cable. From the left in the bottom picture, pin 2 is the right audio channel and pin 4 is the left channel. Source


6

Those variable amplitudes looks like electronics problem like failing caps somewhere along the way (recording/playback) or unshielded too long cables or partial remagnetization or even HW bug (some recorders like ELTA have a bug in writing head circuitry that corrupted tapes a bit each time it was played ...) the correct output should be a rectangular ...


5

I developed few game on the GBA back in the days and I remember that I looked into using the Z80 but found nothing in the official documentation. Even if possible, it is an unsupported feature and therefore I doubt that any Nintendo approved game uses it.


5

DAC is a digital analog converter. There is no such periphery on C64, but the closest to it is the SID chip, for playing sound. Also the SID chip was not designed for that. It can play ADSR (attack-decay-sustain-release) sounds with 4 pre-configured waveforms: This can be hacked to work like a DAC. It can only 16 signal levels, but it is enough to produce ...


5

Yes. What you have on the RCA plug coming from the C64 is line level mono audio. You can connect it to a mixer using an RCA-to-phono adapter that fits your mixer. Often times, the phono jacks on mixers are for stereo input. So you might need an adapter that goes from Left+Right RCA inputs to a phono plug. Just plug the C64 output to either the Left or Right ...


5

SCART is a connector standard, not a video standard. I think it can carry composite, s-videos (chroma/luma), analog RGB, audio and possible other formats depending on what is producing the signal. So there isn't a one size fits all to 'convert' SCART to VGA. However, without checking, if memory serves, I think the 1040 produces analog RGB, so if the ...


5

The MMCs are neither memory storage nor additional CPUs. They're integrated circuits -- basically they're chips containing lots of circuitry. The CPU and PPU in the NES are also ICs, and so is the processor in your computer. The circuitry in the MMCs commonly performed functions like bankswitching and scanline counting The Famicom's cartridge connector ...


4

For my STE, I go straight from RGB to VGA using: An ST RGB SCART cable (this one) A sync stripper (Sync Strike) An LCD monitor that accepts 15kHz VGA (BenQ RL2455HM) This is a clean solution without the need for scan convertors / line doublers and provides a razor sharp picture


4

Another possibility would be to use a cheap USB video capture device, such as this one. (You'll also need a SCART to composite video adapter, which you can buy or wire up yourself). Connect the video oputput of your Atari (or whatever you have) to the USB video capture device, the USB capture device to a modern PC, and then you can see the video output on ...


2

[...]Media Vision Pro AudioSpectrum 16 Patch Panel [...] it appears that this panel was used to interface with the sound card of the same name in old Apple computers [...] The function is clear for every port on it except this one, which is on the side and appears to be intended to connect to the computer itself. Not the computer but the sound card. ...


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