20

The transform applied to project geometry from 3d to the 2d coordinates necessary for drawing on a screen is called a perspective projection. It involves calculating 1/z and multiplying x and y by that. Filling a triangle involves visiting every pixel within it and deciding which colour to put there. To paint a texture that properly obeys perspective you'd ...


15

Just a disclaimer: Most of this is based on observation and assumptions from experience and should be taken with a grain of salt. From what I've seen with this glitch, the audio being played is actually just a very stretched out version of the chimes that play over the second logo which you see when a disc is loaded, rather than a separate sample. Judging ...


14

I'd be likely to endorse the verdict that Ken Kutaragi designed it alone. Kutaragi designed the SPC700, the sound processor used in the SNES. Like any other moderately advanced sound processor, it is part DSP — amongst other things, it contains the logic to pitch shift an audio sample, which pretty much means taking a 1d signal of m samples across and using ...


11

The first generation of consoles use proprietary APIs; I can speak directly as to the PS1. In the PS1's case there's a vector coprocessor for performing 3d transformations and one is subsequently responsible for compiling and supplying list of triangles in direct screen coordinates for drawing. Usually calculated via the vector coprocessor, but it's up to ...


8

There was a relationship between Sony and Nintendo starting in 1988 and into the early 1990s as someone in Sony was looking to get into the video game business after seeing how successful the Famicom was. Agreements were made with Nintendo to produce a CD-ROM technology add-on and work was started. Prototypes were demonstrated in the early 90s which were ...


8

There's a pretty nifty article linked from the Wikipedia article on the Emotion Engine that discusses the details in the "Emotion Is the Difference" section on page 2: But much of the EE’s compute power will go toward an even loftier goal: behavioral synthesis, or, as SCE calls it, emotion synthesis. This technology gives game programmers the ability ...


7

Those companies did implement their own graphics APIs that were very light weight and didn't have too much complex functionality. This was done because their libraries could be tailored to the strengths or weaknesses of their system. They also had very unique architectures that took different approaches to producing 3D graphics. Later on, consoles and PC ...


7

I bet you have a dirty lens or faulty optical drive. Try cleaning the diode with a Q-Tip and a electronic lens cleaning solution. It's also possible that the entire drive is broken or dirty. Does the PS1 read any other discs like audio CDs? It might need an entire spindle hub or optical drive replacement. Maybe some of the tips in this iFixit ...


6

The CPU core is only one of eight parts of the chip. It has two vector units, an image processor, DMA controller and various other components. Together they form the Emotion Engine, which I recall at the time being marketed as bringing procedural generation technology to games to make them more realistic and varied.


6

I found two neat pictures that show the pin order on the AV out port and the AV cable. From the left in the bottom picture, pin 2 is the right audio channel and pin 4 is the left channel. Source


3

But the first systems didn't run an OS like that? Well, they did, some kind of proprietary OS. So how graphics were programmed to these machines? Using functions of said OS, or bare bone. Did the companies developed and implemented their own graphics APIs (like OpenGL)? Exactly. Just usually a lot less advanced than that. It might be useful to keep ...


1

I would recommend getting decent PS2 cable with RF shielding. I had the same issue when connected to TV, even though console's audio was muted.


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