Hot answers tagged

92

I was working in software development at the time, and this wasn't seen as a problem. Colour monitors were expensive and not usually high-quality. In PC-compatibles, the Colour Graphics Adapter (640x200) wasn't regarded as adequate to be the only display on a machine; the Enhanced Graphics Adapter (640x350) appeared the same year as the original Mac, but ...


43

The Mac was designed from the start to be a GUI-based machine so clear, high-resolution graphics were a requirement. At the same time available memory was extremely limited due to cost considerations. The original Macintosh only had 128kB of RAM of which over 21kB were used by the display. Going to even 8-bit color at that resolution would have pushed the ...


36

While some lawyers do occasionally file lawsuits based mainly on their targets having "deep pockets", like Microsoft had, this is not generally successful. In order for a typical corporate lawsuit to gain any traction in the court, the plaintiff must provide sufficient "standing". In order to establish standing, Apple sought to convince the court that ...


34

Objective-C was by all accounts a nightmare to work with I loved it. Loved it. Some background: in the 90s I worked for a developer here in Toronto with a Mac and Win app. I wanted to work on the dev side but I had no formal training, and I found the barrier to entry to be too high for my interest level. To do anything useful, you had to learn the OS, the ...


32

I imagine it being a huge downgrade for some, not to have color on the Macintosh. Macintosh games were black and white in the beginning, while Apple II had color. For back then the whole assumption of a 512x342 pixel B&W display being a downgrade from a display with an effective (*1) colour resolution of 140x192 is so strange(*2), I doubt anyone would ...


28

The official answer (at https://support.apple.com/kb/TA34988?locale=en_US) is that they pretty much made it up as they went along: At some time in Apple's history it was decided to put the "bumps" on the D and K keys while some other computer companies use the F and J keys. [...] Apple engineering has indicated there is no standard, such as ISO or ANSI ...


24

Swift was introduced only in mid-2014 so I think perhaps some of those people's beards have greyed out very rapidly! That aside, Objective-C attempts to fuse two different languages: Smalltalk and C. So it's a compiled language, like C, that for object types also supports dynamic dispatch and introspection, like Smalltalk. It's actually a strict superset of ...


23

Personally I know this from a typewriter course in school (ca. 1973). The machines we used hat slightly different cavity on D/K to support touch-typing. we were supposed always rest our middle fingers there while having the rest afloat. A similar lesson was given for the use of adding machines with a similar keycap for the 5 key. But so far I couldn't find ...


21

Keyboard Switch On the International version Apple IIc the keyboard switch swiched between a country-specific layout and and a standard U.S. layout. On the USA version it switches between the standard QWERTY and a Dvorak layout. (This was not so much a desired feature as a side effect of having to build the European version with a keyboard switch; putting a ...


20

Update April 2019 It looks as though the Three River PERQ was the first commercial machine, as per @MrTelly's answer. Original Answer I hate to quote Wikipedia as a source of truth, but I had a feeling that a Xerox product would take the claim, and it looks as though I was right. The Star workstation, officially known as the Xerox 8010 Information ...


18

The "Control Your Apple ASIC" (CYA) was part of the "Apple IIGS 1 MB" introduced in 1989, which had 1.125 MB of DRAM and twice the ROM space of previous IIGS models. The CYA was much the same as the "Fast Processor Interface IC" (FPI) that earlier IIGS models had instead, and much of the technical documentation refers to either of the chips as the FPI. The ...


17

Alcatel-Lucent won a lawsuit against MS in 2008 on a patent for audio file playback. That was later overruled by a higher court. Bristol Technology attacked MS for not revealing needed Windows sources and entering other markets. MS was charged to pay $1M to Bristol in 2000. Spyglass, the company that originally built what is Internet Explorer today, filed ...


17

According to the Wikipedia article: The keyboard layout mirrored that of the Apple IIe; however, the “Reset” key had been moved above the “Esc” key. Two toggle switches were also located in the same area: an “80/40”-column switch for (specially written) software to detect which text video mode to start up in, and a “Keyboard” switch to select between ...


16

If you have a system running on your IIci you could presumably use that to format your drive, but I'm guessing that's not the case. To build a working image on the SD card, there are two things to get right: the partition map, and the HFS filesystem itself. The SCSI2SD wiki has a page detailing the steps; the short version is setup an old Mac system in an ...


16

I think this page (on archive.org) is about that adapter, which it calls the "AR5328 Apple to VGA monitor adapter." Other sources call it a "Mac to VGA adapter." It works with the Mac LC "pizza boxes," Performa, Quadra, etc. The switches are used to configure the adapter for the sync mode supported by the monitor (composite sync, sync on green, separate sync,...


16

It could be argued that the “war” started with the creation of the software industry, when IBM unbundled its software and services in 1969. Before then, you’d lease a computer and get the software and services along with it. After 1969, leasing or buying the computer was one thing, buying software and services another. Quite a few IBMers and others started ...


16

Stac Electronics obtained a 1994 judgment against Microsoft for patent infringement, based on Microsoft's use of knowledge it had learnt from Stac's source code for Stacker, which it had obtained while considering a purchase of the company, during implementation of DoubleSpace. Microsoft filed an appeal but Stac one-upped them with a successful injunction ...


16

Microsoft Excel was originally written for the Mac, and released in September 1985 (see Wikipedia article here). It was released for Windows 2 in 1987 (and was in fact bundled with a version of Windows). Also, according to Wikipedia, Microsoft Word was released for the Mac "in 1985". It had previously existed as a DOS program, being released for the first ...


14

You can "bring Rosetta back" by installing an older version of Mac OS X which supports it — Tiger, Leopard or Snow Leopard (on the latter it's an optional component). Rosetta was removed from later version for licensing reasons. If you have an installation CD for PowerPC Mac OS X, you can use a full-system emulator to run it. Currently it seems your best ...


14

The Wikipedia entry is a bit jumbled, ambiguous, and in some cases wrong. Perhaps it makes more sense to list changes by Apple II model, as documented by the fantastic Apple II History site. (The book has even more detail.) Apple II (1977) APPLESOFT I, based on Microsoft 6502 BASIC version 1.1 Documented in the November 1977 "Blue Book" Available on tape ...


14

The Macintosh sold for more because — as the shiny new thing — it could be sold for more. It was marketed as an aspirational product, not sold as a reasonable markup on an engineering BOM. The IIgs was about as far as you could go while keeping compatibility with the II range, and served as a useful cash cow funding Apple's Macintosh division for several ...


14

I believe the assumptions of the question are wrong. We did not buy the Mac to play games, it was more or less strictly a business machine. Main usage in the beginning around me was creation of printed material including illustrations. Slightly later the laser printer came along making it possible to create camera ready material inhouse. Of course, I could ...


14

Risk assessment is, of course, subjective, but I wouldn't worry too much if you're behind a firewall, or a router with NAT and no ports forwarded to this Mac. In that case, the only danger comes from actions originating at your machine, either done by you or the OS -- which is mostly software you download and run, websites you open, that sort of thing. And ...


13

I personally agree with all of the answers that say something like “High quality bitmapped monochrome displays beat low quality PC color/character graphics.” E.g. for things like preparing documents for publication - affordable high quality printers were pretty much only monochrome. Why prepare a document that displays colors that cannot be printed? Except....


13

It may have been a combination of hubris and legal prudence on Commodore's part; per Commodore: The Amiga Years: The Amiga designers wanted something more original than [Berkeley Softworks'] proposal. "This may have been unfair, but part of it was we thought GEOS looked too much like a Mac; a color Mac before there was a color Mac," says [Dale] Luck. "It ...


12

Many, if not all of the Performa and Quadra systems seemed to have two names. In the early 1990 Apple (re)named their machines as different lines, according to capabilities, to target different markets. Macintosh LC (for low cost *1). Introduced in 1990 as new low end Mac developed (*2) mainly for the education market, with a special focus to replace Apple ...


12

Sounds quite like Tass Times in Tonetown. Although, IIRC it was about saving Grampa and the antagonist was a kind of a croc with several other besats mixed in 'man', but otherwise it fits. And yes, it was 'punky' :) It also had a remarkable user interface (that's why I remember it at all) combining the text based nature of classic adventures with a ...


12

As for why did the Apple II have color and the new Macintosh didn't? Because color wasn't as important as resolution: "Steve Jobs asserted last January [1985] that no color Mac would surface for a few years at least, until such time as a color equivalent of the LaserWriter was feasible. He contended that color wasn't that important and said the Mac ...


12

TL;DR: It seams as if the Question implies that there was some kind of fiendship between Microsoft and Apple. Such never existed. Microsoft was a major supplier of applications for all ranges of Apple computers and during all time. Details Is it really the case that there was a port of Microsoft Word and Excel that was one of the first really successful ...


11

The biographical evidence for both Jobs and Wozniak indicates that Wozniak's version of Breakout (which is NOT the version Atari would release publicly) was likely developed in the first half of 1974. From the biography of Steve Jobs, we know that in early 1974 Jobs was working at Atari, having been hired in 1973 at the age of 18. We also know that he left ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible