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7

I'll be focusing first on the "How does anyone find that?" part of your question, but that will lead us to the "how did they get there" portion too: There are a few ways. Chance Some things will just happen by random chance. I have come across glitches in some games where I've fallen through the floor, for example. Often these funny ...


7

Since Ocarina of Time was mentioned, I'll say a little about that too, and things that aren't related to faulty collision detection. Many of the really game-breaking glitches in this game (i.e. which speedrunners would find useful) depend on the player doing two or more things simultaneously (or in quick succession), and the game doing unexpected things as a ...


14

No software is ever bug-free, and games are no exception. The reason most of these bugs seem so crazy is that they're complex and frequently require several things to go right (wrong?) at the same time, combinations of things that rarely make sense in the context of normal gameplay. A large portion of these exploits are discovered by people playing the game ...


3

In programming, it's common for a seemingly benign oversight to result in wild behavior. (e.g. division by zero, infinite loops) Weird behavior still notoriously happens even in big-budget, more modern games by Bethesda. In SM64/OOT, the glitches tend to happen because A) the player is able to build up speed beyond the intended cap (backwards long jumping ...


10

A good way to think about it is to consider board, card and tabletop games: A board game has rules: who goes first, what happens when you land on a space; and state: whose turn is it, where the pieces currently are, how much each player has. So does a card game like Magic the Gathering, and a tabletop role-playing game like Dungeons & Dragons has a lot ...


29

The short answer is: These games are built on code which is supposed to simulate the laws of physics, at least for motion. But they are also games, which means that that code has to run fast enough for the game to be playable. To do that on the original hardware (which, after all, cannot run arbitrarily fast like nature does), the code author had to take ...


19

You probably don't encounter these glitches because you play the game as the developers intended. In Oblivion you can pickup plates and stuff to move or throw (which is the intended use), but if you place the plate below yourself while holding, you could jump on it making you and the object move up and then you could jump on it again and again (which kinda ...


112

3D games like Super Mario 64 and Ocarina of Time are time-step-based physics simulators. Their basic design is based on the assumption that nothing goes above a certain speed. Each frame, Super Mario 64 calculates four time steps, in which it (among other things): moves Mario ΒΌ of the distance he's supposed to travel in that frame; then pushes Mario out of ...


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