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There's nothing magical about the N-64 that would make it impossible to emulate. If you had an unlimited budget, you could presumably just buy all of the intellectual property involved and possibly hire some people who worked on the original hardware if they are still available, so you wouldn't have to reverse engineer it all. I don't know why you've got ...


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@KRK Owner Here's your "99.9%": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u2RiDgry7fs I rest my case. @Erik Eidt @snips-n-snails I truly don't know what to answer to your comments. You seem to misunderstand the whole point of this question.


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MAME already emulates various hardware, so I'd say the job is already 99.9%. https://www.reddit.com/r/emulation/comments/6lkqy7/mame_n64_emulation_results/ So - just gonna take a bit of time to squeeze the processing cycles from current hardware (CPU / GPU) My answer would be yes, if you had some super-smart dudes who knew what they were doing with the ...


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Most flashcarts (including the Everdrive) use an FPGA to emulate mappers, which is essentially a programmable ASIC -- a developer writes code in a hardware description language specifying the behavior of the chip. So yes, the mapper is emulated -- but at a lower level than if the entire NES was being emulated through software, since it can't "cheat"...


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Does it really have every single chip that any game ever used as hardware inside the Everdrive? Or does it -- shudder -- emulate them somehow? The latter. In the Super Everdrive and SD2SNES cartridges, the majority of the logic of the cartridge is performed by an FPGA. In photos of the boards, these will be usually labeled 'Altera' or 'Xilinx'. By the term '...


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For historical reasons most computers treat a byte as the smallest unit of data they operate on. A byte only contains 8 bits, so to store a 32 bit value you need 4 bytes. The question is what order the bytes should be stored in. The N64 has a MIPS CPU which is Big Endian. That means it stores the most significant byte first, a lot like how we write numbers ...


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There’s a detailed thread about this on Jul. Basically, there are three data storage orders used for Nintendo 64 ROMs: big-endian, which is the Nintendo 64’s native order (Z64 in the thread); little-endian, which is x86’s native order (N64); byte-swapped, which swaps bytes in the native data pair-wise (V64). Endianness determines the order in which data ...


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